Detailed Curriculum

CORE COURSES

Students will enroll in two of these core courses in the fall, and two in the spring, in addition to the SWM Seminar each semester. Students will also enroll in the field-based practicum course for the summer.

Fall

Water Science and Systems Analysis taught by Linda Abriola, Steven Chapra, Annette Huber-Lee, and Eric Kemp-Benedict


Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This course focuses on hydrology, water resources engineering, water quality analysis, and systems thinking aspects of water. Students gain a broad understanding of the scientific theories and principles related to processes governing water availability and quality and the practice of applying this theory, along with data and models, to address a range of problems of water resources engineering and management. The course is structured around model applications to case studies, which facilitates exploration of issues related to uncertainty, model complexity, and scale. T/Th

9:30-10:45am
TIE

Core Course

 

Interdisciplinary Research Methods and Study Design [CEE 293] taught by Amy J. Pickering and Elena Naumova
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This course introduces the quantitative and qualitative methods that underpin water research. It covers data collection, data analysis, and different research designs, including meta-analysis, experiments, quasi-experiments, modeling, comparative case studies, ethnographies, and mixed designs. The class draws on both scientific literature and experiential practice to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each research method. Students leave the class with an ability to design and evaluate experiments and original interdisciplinary water research.. Th
3:00-5:45pm
TIE
Core Course
 
SWM Seminar I
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This two-semester is seminar built around real-world case studies and simulations, giving students the opportunity to apply their learning to real world water management challenges. F
12:00-2:00pm
TIE
 

Spring

Water Leadership and Impact Management taught by Josh Ellsworth and Kevin Oye
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
To drive positive impact towards the sustainable management of water resources, effective leaders must both grasp technical aspects of water challenges and balance competing demands from multiple stakeholders with differing levels of power and influence. They need to develop both the mindset and the skillset to analyze complex socio-political contexts, work with diverse actors to identify specific problems and opportunities, create practicable solutions, and to persuade, negotiate, and lead others to achieve objectives. This course focuses on developing, in an integrated manner, the creative thinking and planning skills to identify and innovate solutions to tough challenges. It covers systems and problem analysis, budget preparation, donor relations, and effective teamwork. W
3:00-6:00pm
TIE
Core Course
 
Water Economics and Policy taught by Bill Moomaw, Brian Roach, and Erum Khalid Sattar
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This course provides an overview of the economic principles that affect water management, including market dynamics, efficiency and welfare analysis, economic externalities, valuation of water resources, and cost-benefit project analysis. The course ties water economics directly to water policy, focusing on the management of water as a common resource, water pricing as a conservation tool, private-public water management, and the role of water in sustainable development. Tu
1:30-4:00pm
TIE
Core Course
 
SWM Seminar II
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This two-semester is seminar built around real-world case studies and simulations, giving students the opportunity to apply their learning to real world water management challenges. F 12:00-2:00pm TIE
 

Summer

Practicum


Description Day/Time School/Concentration

Students continue to develop and practice skills learned in four core classes and track electives. Through six to eight weeks ( average of 210 hours), of professional experience in a field site off-campus, the students will focus on enhancing their research and management capacities in a water related project. Prior to the summer, the students leverage the SWM faculty network and approach external institutions to secure an opportunity and to develop their practicum goals. The practicum is designed to fit students individually, based upon their strengths, interests, and career goals. Upon completion of the field site portion, students return to campus to deliver a paper or product and to present their experiences to the larger community.  This required summer practicum is supported by a stipend of up to $3,000, intended to cover travel and living expenses for the duration of the practicum.

Full time

6-8 weeks

TIE

Core Course

 

WATER DIPLOMACY TRACK

Students will choose three electives; two in the fall, and one in the spring. Students must choose at least one elective from the Economics/Policy/Diplomacy Concentration, and one from the Analytical Methods concentration.

All electives subject to change.

Required

Complexity Science and Negotiation Theory (Water Diplomacy I) [CEE 293] taught by Shafiquil Islam
Description Semester Day/Time School/Concentration
TBA. Spring T/Th
12:00-1:15pm
Civil/Environmental Engineering
Required Course
 

Fall (choose two)

Environmental Policy [ENV 135/PS 118] taught by Ninian Stein
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Overview of environmental policy focusing initially on the United States experience, then linking to global environmental policy-making. Introduction to the ways in which environmental policies are made in the United States and abroad including major actors, key decisions, and future challenges. Th
1:30-2:45pm
Economics
Economics/Diplomacy/Policy
 
Theories of Conflict and Conflict Resolution [DHP D223] taught by Nadim Rouhana
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This course offers an overview of theories of conflict and approaches to conflict resolution. It surveys theories of conflict that originate in various disciplines including sociology, political science, international relations, social psychology, and law. It presents multiple levels of analysis to explain both inter-state and intra-state conflicts. It also reviews approaches that seek to settle and to transform the relationships of disputing parties. This course will provide an in- depth and a critical look at leading theories of conflict and conflict resolution and will explore some of the major theoretical debates in the field. Tu/Th
12:00-1:15pm
Fletcher School
Economics/Policy/Diplomacy
 
Sustainable Development Diplomacy [DHP P259] taught by Mihaela Papa and Patrick Verkooijen
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Sustainable development diplomacy course examines how to integrate economic, environmental and social equity goals in foreign policy-making. It discusses the emergence of sustainable development as a concept and international institutions and negotiation processes that facilitate its implementation. Focusing on climate, water and forest diplomacy, we address a range of themes including UN climate negotiations, climate finance, environmental refugees, public-private cooperation, and water governance. The course also analyzes China and BRICS-led approaches to sustainable development and their new banks. It offers insights from practice, trainings in mutual gains negotiations and complex UN multiparty negotiations. Students develop expertise in policy analysis and planning, strategic thinking and feedback management. Th
5:30-7:30pm
Fletcher School
Economics/Policy/Diplomacy
 
Water Resources Policy and Planning and Watershed Management [UEP 279] taught by Scott Horsley
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Presents a comprehensive approach to water resources management through the integration of environmental science and policy. Intended for students with or without technical backgrounds. Course examines groundwater, lake, riverine, wetland, and coastal management issues and relies heavily on practical case studies to illustrate successful methods. F
9:00-11:30am
Urban and Environmental Planning and Policy
Economics/Policy/Diplomacy
 
Advanced Data Analysis [NUTR 394/CEE 194C] taught by Elena Naumova
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This project-based course capitalizes on student interests to formulate research questions with understanding of data limitations, conduct multi staged data analysis, and select proper data visualization and graphical representation tools. Students will learn advanced modern analytical tools and techniques essential for analysis in a variety of disciplines such as Climate, Environment, Nutrition and Health applications (knowledge of only one of these disciplines. This course also covers research design, the scientific method, data quality and validity, data management, and research ethics in data analysis. Students should attempt to identify data sets relevant to their specific interests prior to the course. Instructor will approve data set suitability. If students cannot identify appropriate datasets, the instructor will provide a dataset. Designated time outside of the classroom is required for each student to work with the team partner to provide and receive feedback on homework assignments. This course is cross-listed with CEE Special Topics. M
4:45-7:30pm
TIE
Core Course
 

Spring (choose one)

Complexity Science and Negotiation Theory (Water Diplomacy I)* [CEE 293] taught by Shafiquil Islam
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
TBA. T/Th
12:00-1:15pm
Civil/Environmental Engineering
Required Course
 
Global Maritime Affairs [DHP D205] taught by Rockford Weitz
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Over 90% of international trade is carried by sea – the lifeblood of globalization. The world’s oceans also present a myriad of opportunities and challenges in international affairs, such as territorial disputes, opening Arctic sea routes, piracy, terrorism, strained fisheries, mineral and energy extraction, marine disasters, whaling, maritime security and technological advances in maritime domain awareness. The course will explore these issues and other maritime topics based on individual student interests. Course format is lecture and discussion. Writing and speaking skills receive considerable attention. No prerequisites other than a lively curiosity. T/Th
9:40-10:55am
Fletcher School
Economics/Policy/Diplomacy
 
Science Diplomacy: Environmental Security in the Arctic Ocean [DHP P259] taught by Paul Berkman
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This course will address “science diplomacy” as an emerging interdisciplinary field with global relevance to promote cooperation and prevent conflict among nations. The first formal dialogue between NATO and Russia about security issues in the Arctic Ocean will be used as a case study, team-taught by the two co-directors of the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Environmental Security in the Arctic Ocean at the University of Cambridge in 2010. The resulting book, which has over 40,000 downloads, will serve as the key text to address the elements of science diplomacy that apply across our civilization: (1) understanding of changes over time and space; (2) instruments for Earth system monitoring and assessment; (3) early warning systems; (4) catalysts of public-policy agendas; (5) features of international legal institutions; (6) sources of invention and commercial enterprise; (7) continuity across generations; (8) and global tool of diplomacy. Overall objective of this course is to consider the contributions of science diplomacy for building common interests among nations so that we can balance economic prosperity, environmental protection and societal well-being – in view of today’s urgencies and the needs of future generations – across our world.This course is designed as a seminar for two hours on Thursday mornings and will be co-taught via videoconference by Professor Paul Berkman at The Fletcher School in Boston and by Professor Alexander Vylegzhanin at MGIMO University in Moscow, involving fifteen students on each side. United States and Russian students will learn together in the shared classroom environment and collaborate on projects throughout the semester, leading to a Mock Arctic Council Ministerial Meeting and shared production of a mock ministerial declaration. Th
8:30-11:00pm
Fletcher School
Economics/Policy/Diplomacy
 
Natural Resource Policy [UEP 263] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
TBA TBA
TBA
Urban and Environmental Planning and Policy
Economics/Policy/Diplomacy
 
Topics in Environmental Economics [EC 130] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Research seminar for students who wish to pursue environmental economics beyond the level of EC 30. Topics may include the design and administration of environmental excise taxes, the theory and practice of benefit-cost analysis, the economics of renewable and exhaustible resources, and the sustainability of economic growth. Prerequisites: Economics 11 and 30, or consent. TBA
TBA
Economics
Economics/Policy/Diplomacy
 
Environmental Negotiations [ENV 152] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
An introduction to the history and current application of environmental negotiations in response to complex environmental challenges. Study of both the theory behind varied approaches to negotiating environmental agreements and the international and domestic systems through which such negotiations take place. Combines both traditional seminar discussions and hands-on activities such as negotiation simulations. TBA
TBA
Economics
Analytical Methods
 
Introduction to Geographical Information Systems [ENV 107/GIS 101] taught by Sumeeta Srinivasan
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Broad foundation of Geographic Information Systems theory, capabilities, technology, and applications. Topics include GIS data discovery, data structure and management; principles of cartographic visualization; and basic spatial analysis and modeling. Assignments concentrate on applying concepts covered in lectures and class exercises to term projects in each student's fields of interest. TBA
TBA
Environmental Science
Analytical Methods
 
Geographical Information Systems [CEE 187] taught by Laurie Baise
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Spatial analysis with Geographic Information Systems (GIS), including their use for engineering applications. GIS data structure and management, techniques for spatial analysis. Applications including seismic hazard, water resources, and environmental health. Laboratory exercises in GIS. Recommendations: ES 56. TBA
TBA
Civil/Environmental Engineering
Analytical Methods
 
Water Quality Modeling [CEE 103] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
TBA TBA
TBA
Civil/Environmental Engineering
Analytical Methods
 
Engineering Systems [ES 152] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
TBA TBA
TBA
Engineering Science
Analytical Methods
 
Environmental and Water Resources Systems Engineering [CEE 214] taught by Jon Lamontagne
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Mathematical models of water resource and environmental systems are presented in combination with optimization procedures, decision theory, and environmental applied statistics to generate an integrated approach to the planning, design, and management of complex water resources systems. Water resources systems applications are formulated as decision problems where an optimal solution is sought, yet cost, safety, environment, and technology appear as competing constraints. Applications include regional water quality management; siting treatment plants; reservoir system operations; and design, irrigation, flood control, and watershed planning. M/W
1:30-2:45pm
Civil/Environmental Engineering
Analytical Methods
 
Environmental Statistics [CEE 202/ENV 202] taught by Jonathan Lamontagne
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Methods for analyzing environmental data, which is often censored, skewed, and correlated in space and time. Topics include exploratory data analysis, nonparametric methods, hypothesis testing, multivariate statistics, frequency analysis, uncertainty analysis, experimental design, and model building. Recommendations: ES 56 or equivalent. TBA
TBA
Civil/Environmental Engineering
Analytical Methods
 
Data Analysis [MATH 150-02] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This class is about the computational analysis of large sets of multidimensional data, thought of as large clouds of points in Rd. We focus on fundamental ideas based on Linear Algebra, presented without assuming a background in Statistics. TBA
TBA
Mathematics
Analytical Methods
 

WATER, FOOD, AND ENERGY TRACK

Students will choose four electives; two in the fall, and two in the spring. 

All electives subject to change.

Fall (choose two)

Global Climate Change [EOS 151] taught by Andrew Kemp
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Introduction to Earth’s climate system to better understand causes of present and future climate change. Emphasis placed on processes that control Earth’s modern climate, such as global energy budgets, the behavior of greenhouse gases, and features of global and regional climate systems such as El Nino South Oscillation. Lectures and problem-based classroom exercises. Prerequisite: Grad student with permission M/W/F
8:30-9:20am
Earth and Ocean Sciences
 
Food Justice [NUTR 285/UEP 285] taught by Julian Agyeman
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This class offers students different lenses, such as critical race theory to see how the intersectionality of race, class, gender, sexuality, ability and citizenship play out in the development of systemic structural and socio-spatial inequities and injustices in food systems. It develops an understanding and contextualization of the role of food justice activism within the broader narrative of the alternative food movement and offers emerging ideas about how policymakers and planners can take a role in increasing food justice beyond the more mainstream and ultimately contested notions of what is ‘local’ and ‘sustainable.’ The course will help participants chart their role(s) in advocating for ‘just sustainability’ as a defining factor in becoming food systems planners and policymakers.Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. This course is cross-listed with UEP 0285. T
1:30-4:00pm
Friedman School
 
Fundamentals of U.S. Agriculture [NUTR 215/UEP 223] taught by Nicole Elizabeth Tichenor and Tim Griffin
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This course covers the major social, institutional and human aspects of the American agricultural system, both as it exists today as well as its historical development. After consideration of agricultural systems in general and of the values that underlie different concepts of agriculture, it covers some of the key historical forces that have made American agriculture what it is today, and the major role of the federal government, both past and present. The next part of the course deals with the economics of American agriculture as a whole and its large-scale structure, followed by an analysis of farming on the microlevel, emphasizing types of farms and farm-scale production economics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor consent. This course is cross-listed with AS&E's UEP Department (UEP 0223) W
9:00-12:00pm
Friedman School
 
Biology of Water and Health [CEE 251/PH 241] taught by David Gute and Jeffrey Griffiths
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Emphasis is placed on participants understanding the biology of water and health. Participant will demonstrate knowledge of the central role of water in health, including adequate hydration. Detailed coverage of selected prototypic or model disease which include Schistosomiasis, Cryptosporidiosis, cholera, and others. Participant will become familiar with widespread chemical agents and their interactions with pathogens. Participants will demonstrate a familiarity with the appropriate methods of assessing the occurrence of water borne disease. Participants will become knowledge about the principal methods of controlling the propagation of water-born disease. Participants will become knowledgeable social and institutional factors influencing sanitation and water treatment decision and the subsequent impacts on a variety of health indices. W
1:30-4:00pm
Civil/Environmental Engineering
 
Water Resources Policy and Planning and Watershed Management [UEP 279] taught by Scott Horsley
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Presents a comprehensive approach to water resources management through the integration of environmental science and policy. Intended for students with or without technical backgrounds. Course examines groundwater, lake, riverine, wetland, and coastal management issues and relies heavily on practical case studies to illustrate successful methods. F
9:00-11:30am
Urban and Environmental Planning and Policy
 
Climate Change and Clean Energy Policy [DHP P254] taught by Kelly Sims Gallagher
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This course examines how governments respond to the challenges posed by the complex problem of global climate change and how clean energy policies can help countries achieve multiple goals. The latest science, technological developments, economic assessments of costs and opportunities, the role of the media, domestic and international politics, and innovation are all discussed. Policy instruments for climate mitigation, adaptation, and a clean energy economy are introduced and thoroughly analyzed in a comparative way across most of the major-energy consuming countries. In-class exercises including an international negotiation simulation illuminate course themes. The course introduces and strengthens multidisciplinary policy analysis skills. M/W
11:05-12:20pm
Fletcher School
 

Spring Electives (choose two)

Food for All: Ecology, Biotechnology, and Sustainability [BIO 185] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
With the human population expected to exceed 9 billion by 2050, how will we support our farmers and meet the increasing demand for food in an ecologically sustainable way? Historically, rapid increases in yield have been a result of advances in three main technologies: (1) genetic improvement; (2) use of synthetic pesticides and fertilizers; and (3) expanded irrigation. Each of these technological advances, however, has limitations or has led to significant environmental degradation. There is an urgent need for new approaches to food production without destroying the environment. We will evaluate: (1) how ecological knowledge makes food production more sustainable; (2) what existing and emerging approaches can contribute to a reliable supply of nutritious food; and (3) the political and economic drivers that shape who has access to these technologies. We will also explore stakeholder-specific perspectives, as well as develop important communication skills for negotiating these different perspectives. TBA
TBA
Biology
 
Hydrology and Water Resources [CEE 112] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
An introduction to the science of hydrology and to the design of water resource systems. Basic hydrologic processes such as precipitation, infiltration, groundwater flow, evaporation, and streamflow are discussed. Applications of hydrology to water supply, flood control and watershed modeling are emphasized. Students develop their own hydrologic models using computer software. Recommendations: CEE12 TBA
TBA
Civil/Environmental Engineering
 
Integrated Water Resource Planning and Management [CEE294-2C] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
TBA Th
TBA
Civil/Environmental Engineering
 
Natural Resource and Environmental Economics [EIB E246] taught by Shinsuke Tanaka
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This course is designed for students who are interested in learning theoretical approaches and empirical tools economists use to analyze environmental problems and policies. Topics include: 1) Modeling environmental problems from an economic perspective, using market theory, a public goods model, and externality theory; 2) Analyzing regulatory policies and pollution-control instruments based on command-and-control approach and the market-based approach; and 3) Assessing the costs and benefits of environmental goods and policies using contingent valuation and hedonic pricing methods. Th
3:20-5:20pm
Fletcher School
 
Agriculture and Natural Resource Economics [NUTR 341] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
In this class we will be studying a broad range of environmental and natural resource problems through the tools and concepts of microeconomics - the social science that deals with balancing our (seemingly unlimited) wants and needs within the limitations of our personal, social, and natural environments. It therefore provides useful frameworks for considering issues such as how we protect and use our land, forests, and oceans; the impact of climate change on food production; societal investment in land, water, and soil quality; and how private and social incentives can help overcome market failures. Economic aspects of environmental and agricultural policies will be a major focus. TBA
TBA
Friedman School
 
International Energy Policy [DHP P255] taught by Kelly Sims Gallagher
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Energy affects every dimension of human society and it is crucial for economic prosperity. Energy is at the heart of economic development strategies, national security challenges, and intractable environmental problems. This review course maps how challenges and opportunities differ among countries, exploring basic differences between industrialized and developing countries. The policies of major energy producers and consumers are compared. The focus is on oil and gas, but renewable energy sources are also considered. Topics include: energy and the world economy, the geopolitics of oil and gas, energy markets, energy policy and economic development, climate change, technological change and the future of energy. M/W
11:05-12:20pm
Fletcher School
 
Offshore Wind [CEE 193E] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
TBA TBA
TBA
Civil/Environmental Engineering
 
Agricultural Science and Policy I [NUTR 233] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This course covers the major biological, chemical and physical components of agricultural systems. Each is discussed from the viewpoints of both the underlying natural processes and principles, and their significance for major agricultural, food safety, and environmental policy issues in the US today. In the first semester, the topics covered are soils, water, nutrients, and genetic resources. TBA
TBA
Friedman School
 

WATER INFRASTRUCTURE FOR HUMAN SETTLEMENTS ELECTIVES

Students will choose three electives; two in the fall, and one in the spring. Students must choose at least one elective from the Water Science Concentration, and one from the Water Infrastructure Policy and Planning concentration.

All electives subject to change.

Required

Water Resource Systems [CEE 214] taught by Jonathan Lamontagne


Description Semester Day/Time School/Concentration
Mathematical models of water resource and environmental systems are presented in combination with optimization procedures, decision theory, and environmental applied statistics to generate an integrated approach to the planning, design, and management of complex water resources systems. Water resources systems applications are formulated as decision problems where an optimal solution is sought, yet cost, safety, environment, and technology appear as competing constraints. Applications include regional water quality management; siting treatment plants; reservoir system operations; and design, irrigation, flood control, and watershed planning. Spring M/W

1:30-2:45pm
Civil/Environmental Engineering

Water Science

 

Fall (choose two)

Biology of Water and Health [CEE 251/PH 241] taught by David Gute and Jeffrey Griffiths
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Emphasis is placed on participants understanding the biology of water and health. Participant will demonstrate knowledge of the central role of water in health, including adequate hydration. Detailed coverage of selected prototypic or model disease which include Schistosomiasis, Cryptosporidiosis, cholera, and others. Participant will become familiar with widespread chemical agents and their interactions with pathogens. Participants will demonstrate a familiarity with the appropriate methods of assessing the occurrence of water borne disease. Participants will become knowledge about the principal methods of controlling the propagation of water-born disease. Participants will become knowledgeable social and institutional factors influencing sanitation and water treatment decision and the subsequent impacts on a variety of health indices. W
1:30-4:00pm
Civil/Environmental Engineering
Water Science
 
Environmental Toxicology [CEE 157/ENV 167] taught by Anne Marie C. Desmaris
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This course is designed to present the basic scientific principles of toxicology and the relationship of toxicology to health-based risk assessment and hazardous materials management. The toxic effects of hazardous substances on specific organ systems are described, as well as the mechanisms of action of some frequently encountered environmental contaminants. Specialized topics related to the field of toxicology are also discussed, including animal to human extrapolation of data, mutagenicity/carcinogenicity, and teratogenesis. Recommendations: Senior standing or consent of instructor. M/W
6:00-7:15pm
Civil/Environmental Engineering
Water Science
 
Hydrology of the Built Environment [CEE 111/ENV 112] taught by James F. Limbrunner
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Processes and land surface characteristics that affect stormwater flows, including land-use intensification influence on flooding, geomorphic stability, and nonpoint source pollution. Design of mitigation measures based on drainage and detention, as well as land-use planning, low impact development, best management practices, and green infrastructure. T/Th
7:30-8:45pm
Civil/Environmental Engineering
Water Infrastructure Policy and Planning
 
Water Resources/Watershed Management [UEP 279] taught by Scott Horsley
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Presents a comprehensive approach to water resources management through the integration of environmental science and policy. Intended for students with or without technical backgrounds. Course examines groundwater, lake, riverine, wetland, and coastal management issues and relies heavily on practical case studies to illustrate successful methods F
9:00-11:30am
Urban and Environmental Planning and Policy
Water Infrastructure Policy and Planning
 
Green Urban Design [UEP 264] taught by Christine Cousineau
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
The course applies sustainable design principles to selected urban sites with the objective of creating meaningful places of residence, work, shopping and entertainment for current and future communities. Student teams select a site and work on its redevelopment. Students learn to do urban design analysis, research relevant history, demographics, and the market environment, develop a program of uses, propose a design using SketchUp, apply LEED for Neighborhood Development criteria, present their project to the class, and produce a final planning report. Lectures, readings and assigned papers are designed to inform the planning and design process. W
6:30-9:00pm
Urban and Environmental Planning and Policy
Water Infrastructure Policy and Planning
 
Public Health and the Built Environment [UEP 224] taught by Mary E. Davis
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This course introduces the quantitative and qualitative methods that underpin water research. It covers data collection, data analysis, and different research designs, including meta-analysis, experiments, quasi-experiments, modeling, comparative case studies, ethnographies, and mixed designs. The class draws on both scientific literature and experiential practice to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of each research method. Students leave the class with an ability to design and evaluate experiments and original interdisciplinary water research. Sat
10:00-2:00pm
Urban and Environmental Planning and Policy
Water Infrastructure Policy and Planning
 

Spring (choose one)

Water Resource Systems [CEE 214]* taught by Jonathan Lamontagne
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Mathematical models of water resource and environmental systems are presented in combination with optimization procedures, decision theory, and environmental applied statistics to generate an integrated approach to the planning, design, and management of complex water resources systems. Water resources systems applications are formulated as decision problems where an optimal solution is sought, yet cost, safety, environment, and technology appear as competing constraints. Applications include regional water quality management; siting treatment plants; reservoir system operations; and design, irrigation, flood control, and watershed planning. M/W
1:30-2:45pm
Civil/Environmental Engineering
Water Science
 
River Hydraulics and Stream Restoration [CEE 131] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
The physical and mathematical basis for steady and unsteady flow processes in hydraulic engineering, with emphasis on fluvial systems. Numerical procedures for gradually varied steady flow and rapidly varied unsteady flow will be covered with applications to floodplain delineations, flood routing, dam safety, and river restoration. Other applications may include the design of hydraulic structures such as culverts, stilling basins, spillways, levees, weirs, fish ladders, and retention/detention ponds. With laboratory. TBA
TBA
Civil/Environmental Engineering
Water Science
 
Chemical Principles in Environmental and Water Resources Engineering [CEE 212] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Chemical Principles in Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Course Description: Basic principles of water chemistry related to environmental and water resources engineering. Thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium, acid-base reactions, alkalinity, complexation, precipitation, dissolution, sorption, and reduction-oxidation reactions. Quantitative problem solving. TBA
TBA
Civil/Environmental Engineering
Water Science
 
Bioremediation: Natural and Enhanced [CEE 139] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
TBA TBA
TBA
Civil/Environmental Engineering
Water Science
 
Water Quality Monitoring [CEE 215] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Numerical computer modeling for environmental and water-resources simulation. Mass and energy balances, reaction kinetics, transport, and numerical solution techniques. Pollutants including pathogens, toxic substances, organic carbon/oxygen, heat, eutrophication, and pH in rivers, lakes and estuaries. TBA
TBA
Civil/Environmental Engineering
Water Science
 
Environmental Economics [EC 246} taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
TBA TBA
TBA
Economics
Water Infrastructure Policy and Planning
Environmental Law [CEE 207] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Analysis of environmental law and natural resource management at the federal, Tribal, state and local levels of government. The course is designed for those planing careers in environmental science, land use planning and environmental management and should be of value to others interested in learning about the structure of the nation's primary pollution statues and mechanisms for managing and protecting natural resources. TBA
TBA
Civil/Environmental Engineering
Water Infrastructure Policy and Planning
Climate Change Policy, Planning, and Action [UEP 221] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Examination of climate change problem from perspective of scientific evidence, policy responses and media coverage. Sources of greenhouse gas emissions and a wide range of mitigation and adaptation measures are explored and assessed. Overview of climate change solutions being taken or planned by governments, communities, and institutions (both for profit and non-profit) and for major systems, e.g. transportation, buildings, and energy. TBA
TBA
Urban and Environmental Planning and Policy
Water Infrastructure Policy and Planning
 
Natural Resources Policy [UEP 263] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This course provides a broad discussion and debate of public policy issues relating to the use and management of natural resources in the United States. We will examine in detail the major natural resource categories and review the means and techniques available to federal, state and local governments to plan and protect the natural resources reviewed. The course focus is on the relationship between science, law and planning as the proper means for formulating public policy. An underlying presumption is that natural resources cannot be protected unless: (1) governments embrace a holistic—scientific, planning and legal—vision of natural systems and (2) planners and policy makers understand the link between natural resource management and historic concepts of property and property ownership. TBA
TBA
Urban and Environmental Planning and Policy
Water Infrastructure Policy and Planning
 
Developing Sustainable Communities [UEP 284] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This elective course explores the many challenges of achieving 'just sustainabilities' through a critical, coherent and thought provoking overview of moves towards developing sustainable communities. The course focuses on: improving our quality of life and wellbeing; meeting the needs of both present and future generations (intra-generational and intergenerational equity); justice and equity in terms of recognition, process, procedure, and outcome; living within ecosystem limits (also called 'one planet living'). It investigates the theories of sustainable development and the tools and techniques and in what contexts we can move towards the ecological integrity, economic security, empowerment, responsibility and social well-being characteristic of sustainable communities. Case studies are drawn from around the world. TBA
TBA
Urban and Environmental Planning and Policy
Water Infrastructure Policy and Planning
 
Planning for Low Impact Development [UEP 206] taught by TBA


Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Designed for students in the field of planning, engineering, and environmental policy. Provides a land use planning approach and specific site planning skills. Low impact development (LID) is a land use planning and a site planning approach that integrates conservation design principles and specific best management practices to minimize or eliminate the environmental impacts associated with development. Course will present planning approaches using actual case studies. A field trip to visit LID projects will be scheduled. TBA

TBA
Urban and Environmental Planning and Policy

Water Infrastructure Policy and Planning

 

WATER, SANITATION, AND HYGIENE IN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND HUMANITARIAN RESPONSE ELECTIVES

Students will choose two electives; one in the fall, and one in the spring.

All electives subject to change.

Required

Humanitarian Action in Complex Emergencies [NUTR 229/DHP D230] taught by Daniel Maxwell

 

Description Semester Day/Time School/Concentration
The intent of the class is to introduce students to a broad range of research and writing that constitutes our knowledge on humanitarian action in complex emergencies, and to give the student the skills to read research and keep abreast of a rapidly evolving field. There is a strong emphasis on the practical application of this knowledge. The course simultaneously treats humanitarian action as a phenomenon to be understood and as a practice that urgently needs to be improved. This multi-disciplinary course will cover a broad range of subjects, and has a number of objectives. By the end of the course, students will be able to: Outline historical perspectives on humanitarian action; Describe and define the application of international humanitarian law, principles, and codes of conduct to humanitarian action in complex emergencies, and outline major debates surrounding these frameworks; Utilize the main analytical frameworks for addressing the protection of life, livelihoods, rights and safety of people caught in complex emergencies; Critically and quickly read, interpret and apply research on humanitarian action; Analyze the political economy of conflict and humanitarian assistance; Discuss the ethical and practical implications of incorporating human rights in humanitarian action; Utilize methodologies for improving the quality, effectiveness and accountability of humanitarian action; and Describe the evolving nature of conflict, crisis, and the architecture of the humanitarian system. Fall M

3:15-6:15pm
Friedman School

 

Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene in Low-Income Regions [CEE 196] taught by Daniele Lantagne
Description Semester Day/Time School/Concentration
TBA Spring TBA TBA Civil/Environmental Engineering
 

Fall (choose one)

Humanitarian Action in Complex Emergencies [NUTR 229/DHP D230] taught by Daniel Maxwell
 
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
The intent of the class is to introduce students to a broad range of research and writing that constitutes our knowledge on humanitarian action in complex emergencies, and to give the student the skills to read research and keep abreast of a rapidly evolving field. There is a strong emphasis on the practical application of this knowledge. The course simultaneously treats humanitarian action as a phenomenon to be understood and as a practice that urgently needs to be improved. This multi-disciplinary course will cover a broad range of subjects, and has a number of objectives. By the end of the course, students will be able to: Outline historical perspectives on humanitarian action; Describe and define the application of international humanitarian law, principles, and codes of conduct to humanitarian action in complex emergencies, and outline major debates surrounding these frameworks; Utilize the main analytical frameworks for addressing the protection of life, livelihoods, rights and safety of people caught in complex emergencies; Critically and quickly read, interpret and apply research on humanitarian action; Analyze the political economy of conflict and humanitarian assistance; Discuss the ethical and practical implications of incorporating human rights in humanitarian action; Utilize methodologies for improving the quality, effectiveness and accountability of humanitarian action; and Describe the evolving nature of conflict, crisis, and the architecture of the humanitarian system. M
3:15-6:15pm
Friedman School
 
Biology of Water and Health [CEE 251/PH 241] taught by David Gute and Jeffrey Griffiths
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Emphasis is placed on participants understanding the biology of water and health. Participant will demonstrate knowledge of the central role of water in health, including adequate hydration. Detailed coverage of selected prototypic or model disease which include Schistosomiasis, Cryptosporidiosis, cholera, and others. Participant will become familiar with widespread chemical agents and their interactions with pathogens. Participants will demonstrate a familiarity with the appropriate methods of assessing the occurrence of water borne disease. Participants will become knowledge about the principal methods of controlling the propagation of water-born disease. Participants will become knowledgeable social and institutional factors influencing sanitation and water treatment decision and the subsequent impacts on a variety of health indices. W
1:30-4:00pm
Civil/Environmental Engineering
 
Epidemiology [NUTR 204] taught by Gitanjali M. Singh and Silvina Furlong Choumenkovitch
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This course covers basic epidemiologic methods and concepts, including study design, calculation and interpretation of measures of disease frequency and measures of effect, sources of inaccuracy in experimental and observational studies, causal inference, and an introduction to the statistical evaluation and interpretation of epidemiological data. Students will discuss historical examples and recent studies in order to apply their understanding of abstract concepts and specific quantitative methods to the interpretation and critique of published work. T
9:00-12:00pm
Urban and Environmental Planning and Policy
 

Spring (choose one)

Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene in Low-Income Regions [CEE 196]* taught by Daniele Lantagne
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
TBA TBA
TBA
Civil/Environmental Engineering
 
International Humanitarian Response [NUTR 324] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This course will offer a practical and in-depth analysis of the complex issues and skills needed to engage in humanitarian work in field settings. Through presentations offered by the faculty of the Humanitarian Studies Initiative and guest speakers who are experts in their topic areas, students will gain familiarity with the primary frameworks in the humanitarian field (human rights, livelihoods, Sphere standards, international humanitarian law) and will focus on practical issues that arise in the field, such as rapid assessments, application of minimum standards for humanitarian response, and operational approaches to relations with the military in humanitarian settings. Each student will be part of a team representing an international humanitarian non-governmental organization. Topics covered: Humanitarian response community and history; International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights Law; Sphere standards and sectoral applications (shelter, water and sanitation, food security, health); Civil-military relations, media skills, logistics, and budgeting; Monitoring and evaluation, accountability, and livelihoods; Personal security, mental health, stress, and teamwork; and Humanitarian technology. These topics will provide the foundational knowledge and skills needed to perform successfully during a three-day intensive field simulation of a humanitarian crisis. TBA
TBA
Friedman School
 
Globalization and Health [CH 184] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This class will explore public health issues in the global economy with a focus on economic development and the social determinants of health as defined by the World Health Organization. The guiding question for this seminar is: What determines the social determinants of health? Global economic phenomena such as trade, debt, investment, financial crises, migration, resource exploitation, and industrial development have profound impacts on global health and countries’ abilities to meet the basic human needs of their populations. Countries experiencing rapid economic transitions, such as China and Mexico, are also experiencing profound transitions in health related to changes in nutrition and the environment. Through examples from a diverse set of countries, we will investigate the health impacts of globalization, neoliberalism, and economic development projects and look at opportunities to mitigate negative effects through social standards, Health in All Policies initiatives, corporate responsibility, treaties, and sustainable development. Topics will include global supply chains in manufacturing; land, water and resource exploitation; transnational trade agreements; migration and domestic work; spread and adoption of Western cultural beliefs and practices related to health; environmental security and climate change; and policies related to food, tobacco and agriculture. The roles of governments, non-governmental organizations, international trade and development agencies, global corporations and social movements in challenging or promoting health in the global economy will also be highlighted. TBA
TBA
Community Health
 
Nutrition in Emergencies: Policies, Practice, and Decision-Making [NUTR 308] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This course will examine the central role and importance of food and nutrition in complex emergencies. The implications of this for nutrition assessment, policy development, program design and implementation will be examined. This will provide an understanding of; the nutritional outcomes of emergencies (malnutrition, morbidity and mortality); and also the causes of malnutrition and mortality in emergencies (the process and dynamics of an emergency). The course will also develop a broader range of management skills needed in relation to humanitarian response initiatives. TBA TBA Friedman School
 
Monitoring and Evaluation [NUTR 217] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
This seminar will provide an introduction to the principles and practice of program monitoring and evaluation, with an emphasis on nutrition and nutrition-related programs in developing countries. By reviewing relevant literature and utilizing case studies in the areas of nutrition, primary health, agriculture and other fields, students will garner basic literacy of the language and tools of evaluation. This seminar will focus both on the theory and practice of conducting program evaluation and will consist of round-table discussions, guest speakers, and applied exercises of critiquing, planning, and writing evaluations. In addition to the course content, the participatory nature of the seminar is important to the overall learning process. Although there will be speakers at several sessions, the course will largely be run by the seminar participants themselves who will shape the curriculum, design assignments, and be expected to bring forth their personal experiences, opinions, and questions to the subject matter at hand. TBA
TBA
Friedman School
 
Field Methods for Global Health [CEE 150] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Hands-on approach to evaluating global health projects. Research question and study design, human subjects research ethics, survey tool development, sampling techniques (water quality/anthropometrics), data collection and analysis, and information dissemination. Emphasis on applying topics to develop a full evaluation protocol for a self-selected project. TBA
TBA
Civil/Environmental Engineering
 
Biostatistics [CEE 156/CH 156] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Examination of statistical methods used in the analysis of data generated by biomedical and public health studies. Descriptive statistics, probability, basic hypothesis testing with parametric and non-parametric data, ANOVA, linear regression, logistic regression, and an introduction to survival analysis. Instruction in the use of statistical software will be provided throughout the course. TBA
TBA
Civil/Environmental Engineering
 
Occupational and Environmental Health [CEE 158/ENV 158] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
An examination of current topics in the area of occupational and environmental health, with particular emphasis on the types of materials that produce human health effects. Both clinical and epidemiologic data will be used to assess the public health importance of environmental pollutants and to evaluate the effectiveness of control strategies Recommendations: Senior standing or consent of instructor. TBA
TBA
Civil/Environmental Engineering
 
Health Effects and Risk Assessment [CEE 173] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
A study of chronic and acute human health effects of exposure to hazardous materials. Principles of toxicology and pharmacokinetics of toxic substances. Standards for environmental quality, risk assessment methodologies, and risk communication strategies. TBA
TBA
Civil/Environmental Engineering
 
Geographic Information Systems [CEE 187] taught by TBA


Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Spatial analysis with Geographic Information Systems (GIS), including their use for engineering applications. GIS data structure and management, techniques for spatial analysis. Applications including seismic hazard, water resources, and environmental health. Laboratory exercises in GIS. TBA

TBA
Civil/Environmental Engineering

 

Environmental Engineering Processes [CEE 132] taught by TBA
Description Day/Time School/Concentration
Study of the chemical, physical, and biological basis for unit processes commonly used in environmental engineering. Processes representing applications in all environmental media are examined. Emphasis is on rational design of unit processes, with attention to fundamental principles and experimental methods. With laboratory. TBA
TBA
Civil/Environmental Engineering